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Ancient Law in Modern Time

03/20/2018
Seek The Truth Blog

Ancient Law in Modern Time:

In more destructive religious cults, members are manipulated into believing that ancient law is both applicable and required today and that God will punish those who do not obey the laws written for people living thousands of years ago. Most of the major religions today originated over 2,000 years ago and are centered around, derived from, or make use of code or philosophy produced by the ancients. Hinduism and Judaism are almost 4,000 years old, while some of the younger religions that branched away retained parts of the law created during or shortly after their inception. Jainism and Buddhism, both around 2,500 years old, make use of Hindu Law. Islam, 1400 years old, and Christianity, 2000 years old, both make use of or reference the Mosaic Law found in Judaism. Extremist religious cults based off of these religions have one thing in common: they attempt to enforce the laws written for a way of life that existed between 2000 and 4000 years ago.

As religion evolves over time, founders and leaders review and revise the laws of the ancients to be more applicable to modern custom. Islam's Mohammed updated Mosaic Law to form the Sharia Law, a body of rules that still included harsh penalties, but released oppression from other rules. The Buddhas gave a new perspective on Hindu Law to relieve oppression. Christ fulfilled the obligations of the Mosaic Law, offering Christians the Holy Spirit as the guide to righteousness, while the Christian Apostles wrote letters describing or debating which laws still applied to create a new code of conduct.

When long-term extremist cult members escape, they struggle with the concept of progression. Cult leaders defy progression, denouncing others of the faith for not adhering strictly to the old laws. They attempt to circumvent teachings of reformers -- even Jesus Christ -- to reestablish law no longer applicable in their religion. Cults progress backward, not forward, and hinder progress.